Learn About Termite Treatment For Your Home

The National Pest Management Association says that termites actually destroy more homes every year than floods and fires do. The annual estimates for damage are in the neighborhood of $2.5 billion.

Homeowners in 49 of the 50 states have to worry about this. The lucky few live in areas of Alaska where it’s so cold for so long every year that termites are not part of the local ecosystem.

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Termites get attracted to houses in particular very frequently just because many homes have the two major food groups for termites said a termite control Redwood City based. One is wood, and the other is water. Termites digest the cellulose in wood to get energy, and they need moisture in order to not dry up. It’s unfortunately quite possible to have a substantial termite issue without even knowing it, given that termite evidence like mud tunnels and other signs might not be plainly visible to you.

Something to consider is where most of the wood in your home is physically located. Most of it is out of your view because it’s behind your walls. Subterranean termites, such as Formosan termites, can get into a home from the ground. Aerial infestations are also possible, but any termites invading your home will eventually connect to the ground or some other source of moisture that is present in the home. A water leak can help them, but so can simple condensation.

The first step in doing any termite treatment in your home is making the residence unappealing and uninviting to termites, so that you don’t let the current population grow any more in size than it already is. First off, fix any roof or plumbing leaks that you are dealing with. Second, divert any water a minimum of a foot and a half away from your home using fully functional splash blocks, gutters, and downspouts.

Also, avoid having firewood within 10 feet of your home’s foundation. Nor should you let soil or mulch touch the siding of your home; it’s best if they are a foot away too. In fact, with the exception of pressure-treated wood that allows for soil contact, it’s best to eliminate all points of ‘wood-ground’ contact around your home. Seal any foundation cracks you have to prevent moisture from coming in.

The next step is getting rid of the ones that are there, if the preventative measures don’t convince them to move on or help them die off. Fortunately, many hardware, home improvement, and big-box retailers have carpenter ant and termite killers that you can use on a DIY basis. Many kill the critters on contact and keep the killing going for the next three to four months. Follow the directions on them for applying a perimeter around the outside of your home.

If all this doesn’t work, you don’t have time to handle it yourself, or you’re just not sure you got them all and want peace of mind, call in a professional exterminator to handle the situation.

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